Montgomery Reacts to Eight Failing Schools

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By Alabama News Network

Schools were placed on the failing list if they were in the bottom 6% for at least three of the last six years. But State Superintendent of Education Tommy Bice says many of the schools are already showing signs of improvement.

 
"We can get caught up in the negative list. It is what it is. We move forward and be as positive as we can be from it. What I hope we can do is engage more parents to say what is it you can do to if you want to stay there, what you can do to improve," said Tommy Bice, Alabama School Superintendent. 
 
None of Montgomery's eight failing schools improved from 2011 to 2012. Some school board members say they weren't surprised by those numbers and have already started working to fix them.
 
"We knew we had schools in trouble. It is not a surprise. We've been working diligently on those same schools for the last three or four years already. And our goal is to continue to work hard improving those schools," said Eleanor Dawkins, Montgomery School Board President. 
 
Quintavius Brisker will attend at Capitol Heights Middle School, one of the failing schools, this fall. He says he's still excited even with the school's new status. 
 
"I'm looking forward to making good grades and going to the next grade and moving on," said Quintavius. 
 
Eleanor Dawkins says that it's crucial for parents to be involved. She's concerned that the active parents will be the ones using the tax credit to transfer their children to other schools. 
 
"With the continued support of the parents in the community as well as the teachers and administration, we can bring those schools up. Now, whether someone wants to wait that long I don't know," said Dawkins. 


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