Thursday, April 24, 2014

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Roy Moore Acknowledges God While Taking Oath of Office as Chief Justice
By Heather VacLav


He’s known to many as the Ten Commandments judge, but now Roy Moore is back as Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court.

Nearly a decade ago, Roy Moore was stripped of his Chief Justice robes, for refusing to remove a Ten Commandments monument from inside the judicial building.     

“The issue was not about the Ten Commandments or rock or stone, it was about the acknowledgment about the sovereignty of God,” Moore said after going under oath.

The Chief Justice said God was acknowledged throughout the investiture and oaths of office ceremony by Governor Robert Bentley and all the judges who spoke in front of the audience.

Moore wasn’t the only addition to the high court, the newest Supreme Court Justice, Tommy Bryan was sworn in. Bryan has been an Alabama judge since 2005 and lawyer for 20 years.

Governor Robert Bentley oversaw the ceremonies, and said he's appreciated Moore's support, especially after beating him for the republican nomination in the 2010 governor's race.

“[Moore] said that if I had not won, he would not be here but let me say this, had it not been for this man, I would not be here,” Governor Bentley said before officially commissioning Moore as Chief Justice.

Once in office, Moore he says he is focused on fixing the courts' funding.

“We've been cut in funding for so many years, that we're down far below adequate funding and we can’t get cut any further,” the Chief Justice said.

Moore says just as he plans to uphold the constitution, he will continue to support acknowledging God, and he wasn't alone, the Governor had the same idea.

“I truly believe that the people of Alabama are better off when we have men and women who believe there is Someone else who controls their life and this state,” Bentley said.

Roy Moore will start his six-year term as Chief Justice Monday, January 14. He previously served from 2001-2003 before being removed for not upholding a federal judge’s ruling on the Ten Commandments monument.