Students, Faculty React to ASU Board Meeting with Governor

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By Ashley Thompson

How are students and faculty reacting to the three hour board meeting?

Students say they're outraged that while ASU faculty were allowed through the doors, they were not.

"I just want them to talk to me," says a student who'd like to go by Mrs. Hall. "I've been outside the door. It's supposed to be a meeting for the students and I've been outside the door."

Even members of Student Government were denied entry.

"We're supposed to represent these students here," says Student Government Senator Darnell Steel. "This is our job to do it and yet we can't even do it."

Students waited outside the entire length of the meeting, about three hours. At times, their chants could be heard from inside. Student Government President Sharod Campbell says he wants to apologize to all students who weren't allowed in.

"I sent out an email telling everyone to come and then they weren't allowed to get in," he says. "We do apologize, I didn't know as many seats would be reserved."

Seats were reserved for faculty members and of course those on the Board of Trustees. Chairman Elton Dean tells us he thought the meeting went well.

"It went much better than I thought it would and the conversation with the Governor...he's concerned about Alabama State, we're concerned about Alabama State. Whatever problems there are in the audit, we're committed to find out what the root casue is."

ASU Interim President William Harris tells us he'd now like to move forward.

"We're going to be making sure that we respond to any questions that have been raised and that we raise questions about things that we think are inaccurate and we're going to continue that."

But Governor Robert Bentley's Attorney, David Byrne, tells us he believes little was accomplished at the meeting and that he'd like university officials to re-read the audit report.

"I think judge Clemon feels very strongly that his position is correct. I, on the other hand, with Attorney General's opinions and Supreme Court of Alabama's opinions suggest that that needs to be looked at by both sides."





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