Family Reacts To Violent Home Break In Sentencing

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By Alabama News Network

Two men convicted of a violent home invasion in Montgomery have been sentenced to a total of hundreds of years in prison.

 
They were found guilty of armed robbery at the home of former State Representative Jay Love's in-laws.
 
It's been over a year since Love's mother-in-law Louise Walker was beaten with a pistol, fracturing her skull.
 
The family says they're glad the trial is finally over. 
 
Willanu Collins was sentenced to 200 years for the break in and attempted murder.
His accomplice Elton Walton was sentenced to 50 years.
 
Even though the physical scars are gone, the emotional scars are still there for Louise Walker.
Her son in law Jay Love spoke for the family, and says that it's hard to feel safe after a violent break in.
 
"I think that violation is always in the back of your mind. And I'm not sure you ever fully get it back. But we're a family of faith and we know that God is going to take care of us. So we have great reassurance in that," said Love.
 
Chief Deputy District Attorney Daryl Bailey prosecuted the case. He asked for consecutive life sentences, but he's happy with the judge's decision. 
 
"We're pleased with the sentence today. It was a very violent horrendous crime. And it deserved a sentence like this. He was sentenced to 200 years and this is not the first time he's done something like this and been arrested for it," said Bailey. 
 
Walton received a lighter sentence because he pleaded guilty to the armed robbery, and was only charged with assault instead of attempted murder. 

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