Montgomery Residents React to Voting Rights Ruling

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By Ashley Thompson

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that a section of the 1965 Voting Rights Act was unconstitutional.

 

Supreme Court Justices voted that the current formula used to determine which states should get clearance from the federal government before changing voting procedures is unconstitutional. Some people in Montgomery say the justices got it wrong.

"It doesn't make any kind of sense," says Willie Johnson. "It's terrible! It's unbelievable but I'm not surprised. I had a feeling they would do that."

"I think everything should stay the same, the way it is now," says Darryl McDonald. "I don't think there should be changes. The Lord says I change not, and neither should we."

Section four and five of the Voting Rights Act were put into place during the Civil Rights Era, when minorities were often blocked from voting in the South. The ruling suggests that there is no longer the racial discrimination there once was. But some say they're not buying it.

"There's plenty of discrimination, white against black," says resident Leroshay Marshall. "We could walk up in the jewelry store and the white people would still look at us funny."

"I feel like it does still happen in states like Alabama and in the South," says Jemari Morris.

But the ruling does have it's supporters.

"We have too much government now and I think in terms of voting rights, the government should bow out and let the states handle it," says Jerry Arrowood.  

"Any way that you can just keep it in the state, that's what I feel like," Rick Willingham says. "The state takes much better care of it's people than the federal government."

President Obama is now calling on Congress to make sure voting across the county is done fairly and to ensure that every American has equal access to voting polls.

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